WHY NSAIDS ARE CONTRAINDICATED IN ASTHMA

WHY NSAIDS ARE CONTRAINDICATED IN ASTHMA

WHY NSAIDS ARE CONTRAINDICATED IN ASTHMA

Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that causes inflammation and narrowing of the airways. It can lead to wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a class of medications that are used to relieve pain, inflammation, and fever. They include ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

NSAIDs work by inhibiting the production of chemicals called prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are involved in a variety of body functions, including inflammation, pain, and fever. By blocking the production of prostaglandins, NSAIDs can help to reduce these symptoms.

However, NSAIDs can also have some serious side effects, especially in people with asthma. In particular, NSAIDs can trigger bronchospasm, which is a sudden narrowing of the airways. This can lead to an asthma attack, which can be life-threatening.

How NSAIDs Trigger Asthma Attacks

NSAIDs can trigger asthma attacks by several mechanisms. One way is by inhibiting the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). PGE2 is a prostaglandin that has bronchodilatory effects, meaning it helps to open up the airways. By blocking the production of PGE2, NSAIDs can cause the airways to narrow, leading to an asthma attack.

Another way that NSAIDs can trigger asthma attacks is by increasing the production of leukotrienes. Leukotrienes are chemicals that cause inflammation and bronchoconstriction. By increasing the production of leukotrienes, NSAIDs can worsen asthma symptoms.

Risk Factors for NSAID-Induced Asthma

Some people with asthma are more likely to experience an asthma attack after taking NSAIDs. These include people who:

  • Have severe asthma
  • Are allergic to aspirin or other NSAIDs
  • Have nasal polyps
  • Have a history of chronic sinusitis
  • Are smokers
  • Are children or adolescents

Symptoms of NSAID-Induced Asthma

The symptoms of NSAID-induced asthma are similar to the symptoms of other types of asthma. They can include:

  • Wheezing
  • Coughing
  • Chest tightness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Anxiety
  • Confusion

If you experience any of these symptoms after taking an NSAID, it is important to seek medical attention immediately.

Treatment for NSAID-Induced Asthma

The treatment for NSAID-induced asthma is similar to the treatment for other types of asthma. It may include:

  • Bronchodilators: These medications help to open up the airways.
  • Inhaled corticosteroids: These medications help to reduce inflammation in the airways.
  • Leukotriene modifiers: These medications help to block the effects of leukotrienes.
  • Oral corticosteroids: These medications may be used to treat severe asthma attacks.

Preventing NSAID-Induced Asthma

The best way to prevent NSAID-induced asthma is to avoid taking NSAIDs. If you must take an NSAID, there are a few things you can do to reduce your risk of an asthma attack:

  • Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking an NSAID.
  • Start with a low dose of the NSAID and increase the dose gradually, as needed.
  • Take the NSAID with food to reduce the risk of stomach upset.
  • Avoid taking NSAIDs for more than 10 days at a time.
  • If you experience any symptoms of an asthma attack after taking an NSAID, stop taking the NSAID and seek medical attention immediately.

Conclusion

NSAIDs can be effective medications for relieving pain, inflammation, and fever. However, they can also trigger asthma attacks in people with asthma. If you have asthma, it is important to avoid taking NSAIDs. If you must take an NSAID, talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits and take steps to reduce your risk of an asthma attack.

FAQs

1. Why are NSAIDs contraindicated in asthma?
NSAIDs can trigger asthma attacks by inhibiting the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and increasing the production of leukotrienes.

2. Which NSAIDs are most likely to cause asthma attacks?
All NSAIDs can cause asthma attacks, but some are more likely to do so than others. These include ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

3. What are the symptoms of NSAID-induced asthma?
The symptoms of NSAID-induced asthma are similar to the symptoms of other types of asthma and can include wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, rapid heart rate, anxiety, and confusion.

4. How is NSAID-induced asthma treated?
The treatment for NSAID-induced asthma is similar to the treatment for other types of asthma and may include bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, leukotriene modifiers, and oral corticosteroids.

5. How can I prevent NSAID-induced asthma?
The best way to prevent NSAID-induced asthma is to avoid taking NSAIDs. If you must take an NSAID, talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits and take steps to reduce your risk of an asthma attack.

admin

Website:

Leave a Reply

Ваша e-mail адреса не оприлюднюватиметься. Обов’язкові поля позначені *

Please type the characters of this captcha image in the input box

Please type the characters of this captcha image in the input box

Please type the characters of this captcha image in the input box

Please type the characters of this captcha image in the input box